Accomodating intraocular lenses

A transparent, biconvex structure in the eye of a vertebrate or cephalopod that is located between the iris and the vitreous humor and focuses light rays entering through the pupil to form an image on the retina.

Intraocular lenses (IOLs) are medical devices that are implanted inside the eye to replace the eye’s natural lens when it is removed during cataract surgery.

Commissioners and/or providers have a responsibility to implement the guidance, in their local context, in light of their duties to have due regard to the need to eliminate unlawful discrimination, advance equality of opportunity, and foster good relations.

An accommodating IOL is designed to move just like the eye's natural lens does when younger, adjusting as needed when a person looks at something far away and then switches to something close up.

The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) has issued full guidance to the NHS in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland on implantation of accommodating intraocular lenses for cataract.

Nothing in this guidance should be interpreted in a way that would be inconsistent with compliance with those duties.

Providers should ensure that governance structures are in place to review, authorise and monitor the introduction of new devices and procedures.

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